public procurement | In Principle

Go to content
Subscribe to newsletter
In principle newsletter subscription form

public procurement

Claims for procurement damages following Supreme Court resolution III CZP 16/20
In the past, Polish courts took the position that a contractor whose bid was not selected due to a violation of the Public Procurement Law must first file an appeal with the National Appeal Chamber (and possibly a complaint with the state court against the chamber’s ruling), and only then could seek redress from the contracting authority. This discouraged contractors from pursuing claims. A recent resolution by the Supreme Court has changed this situation.
Claims for procurement damages following Supreme Court resolution III CZP 16/20
Tales from the National Appeal Chamber: The specialised nature of medical procurements justifies tougher conditions for participating in tenders
When establishing the conditions for participating in a contract award procedure, contracting authorities often face the dilemma of how to reflect the specific subject matter of the procurement without infringing the principle of proportionality. This task is even harder when the procurement involves specialised medical equipment, where improper servicing could put patients’ life or health at risk. Do such circumstances justify limiting the number of bidders seeking a contract? Yes, the National Appeal Chamber held in its ruling of 29 January 2021 (case no. KIO 3489/20).
Tales from the National Appeal Chamber: The specialised nature of medical procurements justifies tougher conditions for participating in tenders
Tales from the National Appeal Chamber: Protection of trade secrets in public procurement
Trade secrets are a sensitive aspect of public procurement proceedings. They limit the principle of openness of proceedings, but protect sensitive information about the contractor’s business. When granting or denying a request to keep certain information secret, the contracting authority should carefully assess the contractor’s arguments, to prevent abuse of this institution. Despite entry into force of the new Public Procurement Law, this issue is still alive, as evidenced by the recently published ruling of the National Appeal Chamber of 29 March 2021 (case no. KIO 720/21).
Tales from the National Appeal Chamber: Protection of trade secrets in public procurement
Prohibited provisions in subcontracts in public procurement
Contractors often take advantage of their stronger negotiating position by imposing terms in subcontracts. The new Public Procurement Law includes Art. 463 to protect subcontractors from unfairly framed contractual obligations. Will subcontractors benefit from the new regulation?
Prohibited provisions in subcontracts in public procurement
Tales from the National Appeal Chamber: Differences between material and immaterial defects during handover of construction works
Flawless performance of a public contract is very rare. Therefore, the case law has adopted the principle that contracting authorities may refuse the final handover only if there are material defects. But what is the nature of material defects, and how can the procedure for handover of works be properly defined in a public contract? These issues were recently considered by the National Appeal Chamber (KIO) in its ruling of 1 December 2020 (KIO 2965/20), which additionally took a stand on the issue of allegedly grossly excessive contractual penalties and limits on such penalties.
Tales from the National Appeal Chamber: Differences between material and immaterial defects during handover of construction works
Tales from the National Appeal Chamber: Non-statutory grounds for in-house procurement?
Municipal waste collection and transport is the subject of many in-house procurements in Poland. Art. 67(1)(12) of the Public Procurement Law provides one of the possible grounds for awarding such contracts, requiring the contracting authority to meet three conditions. But are there really only three? This issue arose in a case in which the National Appeal Chamber had to decide whether the contracting authority must also meet other, non-statutory conditions to properly award a sole-source contract.
Tales from the National Appeal Chamber: Non-statutory grounds for in-house procurement?
Tales from the National Appeal Chamber: A contractor may freely allocate the value of individual parts of a lump-sum fee
When valuing bids in a public procurement procedure as a lump sum, contractors may freely determine the value of individual parts of the contract. For the contracting authority, only the total value of the contract is relevant, and not the valuations of individual parts. But in every case the contractor should examine the documentation to determine whether the contracting authority has included any limitations in this respect. This is the guidance that can be drawn from the ruling by the National Appeal Chamber of 20 October 2020 (KIO 2101/20).
Tales from the National Appeal Chamber: A contractor may freely allocate the value of individual parts of a lump-sum fee
Tales from the National Appeal Chamber: The contracting authority must create equal conditions for all contractors
Fair competition and equal treatment of contractors are the main principles of awarding public contracts, and all actions taken by the contracting authority in preparing and conducting the procedure must comply with these principles. Nonetheless, procurement procedures often raise questions about how these principles should be applied in practice. Some doubts were recently dispelled by the National Appeal Chamber in its ruling of 15 October 2020 (case no. KIO 2104/20).
Tales from the National Appeal Chamber: The contracting authority must create equal conditions for all contractors
Tales from the National Appeal Chamber: Proper calculation of the three-year exclusion period for breach of an earlier contract
An optional ground for exclusion from procurement proceedings, breach of an earlier public contract, is limited to three years after occurrence of the event that is basis for the exclusion. But a problem arising in practice is which event should be considered when calculating the three-year period. Termination of the contract by the contractor? Repudiation of the contract by the contracting authority? Or perhaps entry of a judgment for damages for breach of the earlier contract? The answer can be found in the ruling by the National Appeal Chamber of 26 August 2020 (case no. KIO 1781/20).
Tales from the National Appeal Chamber: Proper calculation of the three-year exclusion period for breach of an earlier contract
May a contractor whose offer is rejected appeal to the National Appeal Chamber?
A contractor filing an appeal must duly demonstrate that it has standing to appeal under Art. 179(1) of the Polish Public Procurement Law. There is an endless debate in the case law and the legal literature over which entities are entitled to file an appeal in a procedure for award of a public contract. The National Appeal Chamber spoke out in this dispute in its ruling of 23 October 2019 (case no. KIO 2031/19), responding to the question whether a contractor whose bid has been rejected still has a legal interest in filing an appeal.
May a contractor whose offer is rejected appeal to the National Appeal Chamber?
Tales from the National Appeal Chamber: Consequences of imprecise description of conditions for participation in contract award procedure
In the tender documentation, the contracting authority may require contractors to meet certain conditions for participation. These should be precise and duly described so the contractors can adequately demonstrate their fulfilment. But what if the contracting authority has not precisely defined a condition for participation in the procedure? In its ruling of 3 July 2020 (KIO 1001/20), the National Appeal Chamber held that the interpretation of the condition more favourable to the contractor should be applied.
Tales from the National Appeal Chamber: Consequences of imprecise description of conditions for participation in contract award procedure
Securing the payment of taxes may protect against exclusion
If tax arrears are a ground for exclusion under the procurement documentation, exclusion can be prevented by making payment or entering into an agreement with the tax authority. It is worth considering whether providing voluntary security would be an effective way to prevent exclusion.
Securing the payment of taxes may protect against exclusion