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Industrial doctorate: Synergy of science and business
In 2017, the possibility of obtaining a doctoral degree under an industrial doctoral programme was introduced in Poland. This is designed to support innovation by facilitating cooperation between business and universities and scientific research institutes. The doctoral dissertation prepared under the programme is intended to improve the operations of a specific company or solve a technological problem faced by the company employing the doctoral student.
Industrial doctorate: Synergy of science and business
Likeness in a computer game: Real deceased people
We have already written about the conditions under which the likeness of real-life people can be used in a game. But what if a game developer wants to use the likeness of a deceased person, or make an avatar look like a deceased person, e.g. a dead celebrity (aka “deleb”) or historical figure? After all, obtaining the person’s consent is impossible. So can the likeness of a dead person be used freely? In this article, we point out what rules a game developer should follow to ensure they are legally on safe ground.
Likeness in a computer game: Real deceased people
Legal aspects of the video game industry 2.0
Interest in the game development industry is not diminishing. The upward trend has been consistent for several years, and 2021 is sure to bring a further increase. Forecasts indicate that in 2023 the value of the game market will exceed USD 200 billion
Legal aspects of the video game industry 2.0
Likenesses in computer games: Real-life people
Sometimes, a character in a game evokes an association with a real person. This similarity may be intentional or accidental. To ensure they are on solid legal ground, game developers should obtain the consent of the actual person to use his or her image. Failure to do so can result in severe consequences. In this text, we will discuss the rules for using likenesses of real, living people.
Likenesses in computer games: Real-life people
Intellectual property after Brexit
The United Kingdom ceased to be a member of the European Union on 1 February 2020, and the transition period is drawing to an end on 31 December 2020. What will happen with intellectual property from 1 January 2021? How will trademarks, industrial designs, and patents be registered in the EU and the UK? Will the territorial scope of protection of existing rights change? What about .eu domains held by individuals and companies based in the UK? The changes will impact the operation of businesses currently benefitting from rights awarded across the EU. Now they must adapt to the changes and comply with new obligations.
Intellectual property after Brexit
Data and copyright
Is copyright a path to take to protect data? Can data be regarded as a result of creativity and, consequently, a protected work? Does the protection of a data filing system also include the data collected in it?
Data and copyright
New series: Data economy
We are launching a series of articles on the data economy. We use this term to refer collectively to new models of the economy in which the principal role is played by data. Data are becoming an asset in their own right which is more and more often the subject of commercial exchange. This doesn’t mean only personal data. It also, or even primarily, means non-personal data of all sorts, including those generated or gathered by machines, whose value we are only beginning to discover.
New series: Data economy
The name of the game: Video game titles and trademark protection
Sometimes a video game’s title is one of the game development company’s most important assets. Properly selected, secured and promoted, it may constitute a valuable source of income for a long time. Therefore, at an early stage of work on the game, it is worth making an appropriate application to the register, bearing in mind that in the case of trademarks, the principle of “first come, first served” applies. A well-thought-out strategy for selecting and registering a video game title can also save a lot of nerves and money after the game is launched on the market.
The name of the game: Video game titles and trademark protection
In-game advertising: How to play it?
The trend toward advertising in online channels has grown for years, but video games are still not a popular ad platform. While large foreign entities are eager to exploit this opportunity (among game publishers such as Electronic Arts and brands like adidas, Coca-Cola and Daimler), it is harder to find examples of this type of cooperation among Polish entities.
In-game advertising: How to play it?
Legal aspects of the video game industry
The video game development sector has grown rapidly in recent years. With the spread of smartphones, new business models, and distribution platforms, the market for video games has taken off, becoming a key sector of the creative industry. Its growth stirs the imagination and appetite not only of game producers and publishers, but also of the biggest companies in sectors like IT and film, who are increasingly oriented toward the game market. It is also a promising field for investors, particularly from Asia. The industry’s growth has not even been slowed by the COVID-19 pandemic. To the contrary, the industry has taken advantage of this time to reinforce its position and achieve new growth.
Legal aspects of the video game industry
Soap commercials: Intellectual property disputes during the COVID-19 pandemic
The rapid boom in cleaning products suggested that this could be a sector where the first coronavirus-related IP disputes might arise. And so it has proved.
Soap commercials: Intellectual property disputes during the COVID-19 pandemic
Negative PR against a management board member or finance director: Does it concern the company?
Can a statement concerning an individual employed by or affiliated with a company infringe not only the reputation of the individual, but also the reputation of the company? What sort of connection with the company, and what sort of comment, can have such results? What can be the practical consequences for example in litigation? The analysis below is devoted to companies, but the remarks are universal and may generally apply to any legal person (such as a cooperative, foundation, local government entity, and so on).
Negative PR against a management board member or finance director: Does it concern the company?